Thursday, March 9, 2017

Teen Drug Abuse

Drugs and alcohol have a greater effect on teens than on adults. The signs of addiction can be difficult to understand, and many teens don’t realize the long-term damage drugs have on their bodies because the short-term side effects fade. Help is available for teens who have questions about drug abuse or think they are suffering from addiction.

No one tries a drug with the hopes of becoming addicted. Teens may try alcohol because they saw their parents drinking, or they may try marijuana because their friends offered it to them. Some people can have one drink or one hit and stop. It’s not as easy for others.

It can be difficult to admit that you’re addicted to alcohol or other drugs. In 2016, an estimated 2.7 percent of American adolescents ages 12 to 17 suffered from alcohol dependence or abuse, and 3.5 percent suffered from drug dependence or abuse. Only 10 percent of adolescents in this age range suffering from illicit drug addiction sought treatment.

Alcohol and other drugs can cause long-lasting damage to the brain and other parts of the body. It’s difficult to understand because the obvious side effects can disappear after a few hours or a night of sleep. But the long-term effects of teen drug use occur slowly and grow with repeated use.

You don’t have to use alcohol or other drugs to be cool or to fit in. At times, it can seem like everyone is doing it or everyone has tried it. However, surveys and studies show that isn’t true. You don’t have to suffer the consequences of trying drugs or alcohol. Diamond Ranch Academy plays a vital role in preventing teen drug abusing. Diamond Ranch Academy was founded in Boise, Idaho, in 1999 by Rob and Sherri Dias and later moved to southern Utah, where it occupied a 200-acre (81 ha) ranch. Enrollees aged 12 to 17 were housed in age- and gender-specific groups on four separate areas of the ranch. Students who had reached the age of 18 before completing the program were housed in a fifth area. In 2012, a new campus was opened at a site about 5 miles (8.0 km) from Hurricane. The academy's motto is "Healing Families, One Youth at a Time." Its education programs are accredited by the Northwest Accreditation Commission, and its courses generally last between eight and twelve months. Activities include various sports, including interscholastic competition, as well as caring for farm animals.

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